2015, Number 1

Journal of Animal and Poultry Sciences (JAPSC)

Vol 4(1), 2015

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Quantitative Real-Time PCR Analysis of the Caecal Bacteria Population of Broiler Chickens Fed with Corn-Soy Diet containing 20% of Palm Kernel Meal with or without Enzyme Supplementation

1-9

 Sharmila, A. Kasim, H. M. Noor, M. F. Jahromi, and A. A. Samsudin*

Abstract

In the present study, quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction analysis was performed to enumerate the caecal bacterial population of broiler chickens fed with corn-soy based diet containing 20% of palm kernel-meal with or without enzyme supplementation. A total of seventy five day old male Cobb broiler chickswas used in the feeding trial receiving a corn-soy diet with20% of palm kernel meal with or without xylanase or cellulase supplementation at an amount of 200U/kg of feed respectively. On day 35, birds were slaughtered and the caecum content was aseptically collected for the bacterial quantification. Both xylanase and cellulase supplementation in the diet significantly reduced the population of total bacteria, enterococcus and Salmonella spp. bacteria in the caecal digesta of broiler chickens. Moreover, the population of lactic acid bacteria, enterobacteria and Escherichia coli in digesta of broiler chickens fed with enzyme supplementation was also significantly reduced compared to broiler chickens received no enzyme addition in the diet. However, eventhough the population of bifidobacteria analyzed in the caecal digesta of enzyme supplemented broiler chickens was reduced compared to non-supplemented broiler chickens, it is not significantly different. The result obtained suggested that xylanase and cellulase supplementation at an amount of 200 U/kg of feed reduced a number of pathogenic bacteria in the caecal particularly enterobacteria, Escherichia coli and Salmonella spp. bacteria.

Key words: Real-time PCR, Corn-soy based diet with 20% PKM, Caecal bacteria, Enzyme, Broiler chicken

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The effect of partial replacement of yellow corn by banana peels with and without enzymes on broiler’s performance and blood parameters

10-19

 C. Blandon, G. A. A. Hamady, and M. A. Abdel-Moneim*

Abstract

Six weeks experiment was performed using 288 (one day- old) ROSS chicks in order to evaluate the effect of replacing 15, 30 or 45% of yellow corn with dried banana peels (with and without enzyme) in broilers’ diets on their growth performance and blood parameters. The metabolizable energy of banana peels was calculated from a digestibility trial and was found to be 2932 Kcal/Kg. The proximate analysis of dried banana peels showed that they contain 10g/100g (crude protein), 14.91 g/100g (crude fiber), 18.64 g/100g (ash), 0.31 g/100g (calcium) and 0.25 g/100g (phosphorus). The results of the growth experiment showed that the inclusion of banana peels in broilers’ diet did not cause significant changes in broilers’ performance. The supplementation of enzyme in the diets resulted in an enhancement in broilers’ performance parameters numerically with no statistically significant differences. The groups fed on banana peels at the different tested levels with and without enzyme had significantly lower levels of cholesterol and triglycerides as compared to the control groups. The economic study revealed that increasing the replacement level of banana peels resulted in a lower feed cost of the diets. In conclusion, the results of the present study confirmed the use of banana peels in broiler’s diet as a promising application in animal feed.

Key words: Banana peels, Blood, Broilers, Carcass, Enzyme, Performance

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2013, Number 4

  Journal of Animal and Poultry Sciences (JAPSC)

Vol 2(4), 2013

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Feeding frequency interfacing tradition and modernity in dairy production: feeding behavior insights

A. Nikkhah

 91-97

Abstract

Feeding frequency (FF) remains an esoteric strategy in modern dairy production, because of multiple management factors affecting cow responses. The objective was to determine FF effects on eating, ruminating, and chewing behaviors of dairy cows in a non-competitive environment. Eight multiparous, early-lactation Holstein cows housed in individual box stalls received either once daily (1×) at 07:00 h or 4 times daily (4×) at 01:00, 07:00, 13:00 and 19:00 h a chopped alfalfa hay based total mixed ration (TMR) in a crossover design with two 20-d periods. Once instead of four times feeding significantly increased dry matter intake (21.1 vs. 20.0 ± 0.5 kg/d) and elongated the first meal (106 versus 49 ± 21.5 min). Daily time spent eating (303 ± 37 min/d), ruminating (314 ± 34 min/d), total chewing (617 ± 55 min/d), laying (562 ± 57 min/d) and standing (666 ± 49 min/d) were not different between treatments. Findings provide novel evidence on feeding behavior response to FF in early-lactation cows under noncompetitive individual feeding and housing.

Key words: eating behavior, ruminating, chewing, feeding frequency, early-lactation cow

Abbreviations: DMI, dry matter intake; FF, feeding frequency; FML, first meal length; peNDF, physically effective neutral detergent fiber; TMR, total mixed ration.

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Mycobiota and Toxigenecity Profile of Aspergillus flavus Recovered from Food and Poultry Feed Mixtures in Cameroon

Jean Raphaël Kana*, Benoit Gbemenou Joselin Gnonlonfin, Jagger Harvey,

James Wainaina, Immaculate Wanjuki, Robert A. Skilton, and Alexis Teguia

98-107

Abstract

A total of 202 poultry feed and its raw ingredients collected from different agroecological zones of Cameroon were examined for total mycoflora and the ability of A. flavus isolates to produces aflatoxin B1. Dilution plating was used for fungal isolation. The mean fungal contamination levels were significantly higher in maize and peanut meal as compared with broiler and layer feeds. In peanut meal and poultry feed, the most representative fungi were A. flavus, A. niger, A. oryzae, F. solani, F. verticilloides, Penicillium spp, and Rhizopus spp. Of all the fungi encountered, A. flavus was encountered in 90% of white maize and 28.5% of yellow maize samples. The frequency of isolation of the most representative fungi in peanut meal, broiler and layer feed was 100, 94, and 76.5% for A. flavus and 70.6, 82.3, and 76.5% for Penicillium spp, respectively. Molecular identification using the Intergenic Spacer Gene (IGS) for aflatoxin biosynthesis confirmed all fungi identified morphologically as A. flavus. Aflatoxin B1 analysis showed that all the A. flavus isolates encountered were aflatoxin B1 producers. Conclusion from this study indicate that the use of peanut meal in poultry feed is risky, and can impact poultry health and economic benefits.

Key words: aflatoxin, animal feed, fungal contamination, toxigenic

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Effects of dietary administration of multi-enzyme on productive performance of laying hens fed different levels of safflower meal

108-119

A. Ehsani, A. H. Mahdavi*, A. H. Samie and B. Dolatkhah

Abstract

The present study aimed to investigate the effects of dietary supplementation of multi-enzyme on productive performance of laying hens fed different levels of safflower meal. A total of 250 Leghorn laying hens (Hy-Line W-36) 47 weeks-old were randomly assigned into 10 experimental treatments with 5 replicates of 5 birds each. Experimental treatments consisted of five safflower meal levels (0.0, 2.5, 5.0, 7.5 and 10.0 g/100g of diet) with and without multi-enzyme (Bergazym P®,0.0 and 0.1 g/100g of diet) as a 5 × 2 factorial arrangement that fed during a 10 weeks feeding trial. During the experimental period, eggs were collected and weighed daily, and feed consumption was weekly recorded. Then, the productive performance indices including feed consumption, egg production percentage, egg weight, egg mass and feed conversion ratio (FCR) were reported as 14 d intervals and during entire trial period. Feeding laying hens 2.5% and 5% safflower meal showed tendency to increased egg mass in the entire experimental period. This improvement was largely due to the marginal increase in egg production percentage. The best FCR was found in birds fed on diets contained in 0.0% to 5.0 % safflower meal. Feed conversion ratio increased significantly after feeding at least 7.5 % safflower meal. Increase in FCR was due to the trend in decreased egg production and contemporaneous increase in feed consumption. On the other hand, using multi-enzyme did not improve FCR. Adding multi-enzyme increased the egg production percentage and egg mass. Therefore, our results indicated that safflower meal can be included in diets of laying hens up to 5% with no adverse effect on performance. Also, administration of cocktail commercial enzyme to the diets of laying hens would have beneficial effects on productive performance, especially in terms of egg production.

Key words: safflower meal, multi-enzyme, laying hens, performance

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Prevalence of Abomasal Nematodes in slaughtered Goats at industrial Urmia slaughterhouse, West Azerbaijan province, Northwest of Iran

120-124

Mohammad Hakimzadegan* Mahmoud Khalilzadeh Khosroshahi

Abstract:

Parasitic infections are generally regarded as the most prevalent and important health problems of grazing ruminants in Iran. Gastro-Intestinal nematode parasite infections are a major constraint to the small ruminants (sheep and goat) industry and cause to reduce weight gains, growth rate, nutrient utilization and less meat, wool and milk production, also increased costs of management, treatment and even mortality in several cases. A study was carried out to estimate the prevalence abomasal nematodes of slaughtered goats at the Industrial Urmia slaughterhouse from March 2012 to March 2013. During the study period, 130 abomasums of goats were examined according to standard procedures. Four genera of nematodes were identified in the goats abomasum with an overall prevalence of 46.14%. The specific prevalence observed was Ostertagia ostertagi (12.30%), Ostertagia circumcincta. (7.69%), Haemonchus contortus (16.92%) and Marshallagia marshalli (9.23%). Among the species found Haemonchus contortus was the most prevalent and frequent species. No significant correlation was observed between the prevalence of infection with seasons and ages.

Keywords: Abomasal, Nematodes, Goat, Industrial Urmia slaughterhouse, Iran

 

All Contents

The Relationship among Total Dissolved Solid in Water and Blood Macro Mineral Concentrations and Health Status of Dairy Cattle in Qom Area

A. Alizadeh*, M. Mahmoodi, A. Ghazikhani Shad, and S. Jalali

  Full text download

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Effects of calcium salts of fatty acids (Megalac) on reproductive performance and blood parameters of Kalkohi ewes

A. Alizadeh*, F. Azizi, K. Karkoodi, S. Jalali, and M. Ghoreishi

  Full text download

 

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Evaluation of different plating medias and PCR in the detecting of Salmonella Enteritidis from eggs laid by experimentally infected hens

M. S. Madadi*, M. Azari, A. Yazdani

 Full text download

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Detection of Newcastle disease virus antibodies in serum of broiler chickens of Iran

A. Ghaniei*, N. Mohammadzadeh

     Full text download

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Spawning cycle, GSI index and length maturity of Deep flounder in northwest of Persian Gulf, Iran

S. A. Hashemi*, S. A. Taghavimotlagh, A. Hedayati and R. Ghorbani

Full text download

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Seroprevalence of Mycoplasma synoviae and Mycoplasma gallisepticum in one day old broiler chickens in Libya

F. S. Elgnay* and S. M. Azwai

Full text download

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Deep Septic Arthritis of the Fetlock Joint in two Dairy Cows: Clinical, Radiographic and Pathomorphologic Findings

M. Nouri*, S.H. Marjanmehr, I. Nowrouzian

Full text download

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The effect of autogenous platelet rich plasma on experimentally induced osteoarthritis in rabbit’s stifles joint: a radiological assessment

M. Kalbkhani, S. N. Dehghani*, A. R. Najafpour, N. Ghorbanzadeh

Full text download

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Electrosurgical Excision of a large uniform Transmissible Venereal Tumor (TVT) in a spayed bitch: a case report

H. Soleimani Savadkoohi, S.N. Dehghani*, F. Namazi, M. Ahrari Khafi, Y. Jalali

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2013, Number 3

  Journal of Animal and Poultry Sciences (JAPSC)

Vol 2(3), 2013

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On farm evaluation of group treatment of digital dermatitis in dairy cows

I. Nowrouzian, M. Nouri*, F. Zibaee, and F. Katouli

65-72

Abstract

The aim of this blind and longitudinal farm study was to evaluate the efficacy of Provita Hoofsure Endurance (PHE) foot wash solutions in reducing the prevalence of lameness due to digital dermatitis (DD) in dairy cows. Cows (n = 182) from three commercial dairy herds of closed type were diagnosed by lameness and pain scoring, with lesions consistent with DD in different stage of development. On the basis of locomotion scoring system (1-5), the prevalence of lameness was between 28.8% and 43.6%. Cows were considered for individual evaluation based on significant Kappa-value and restrained in a chute for lesion type (0-4), color (0-2) and size (0-2) scoring prior to application of PHE and at the end of trial in walk-through footbaths or group topical spray in milking parlor. Cows were allocated to one of two groups: cows in group 1 were treated with PHE 2.0% twice a day for 3 consecutive days in footbath, and treatment repeated again after 2 weeks with PHE 1.0% twice a day for 3 consecutive days. In group 2, 2.0% solution was sprayed on the palmar surface of the feet. Changes in each score between initial and final scoring were calculated and the comparison was made statistically using non-parametric U-test with 0.05 level of significance. From the results of this farm study, it is concluded that the application of PHE alleviates lameness significantly at the herd- or the cow-level as part of a control program of DD.

Key words: digital dermatitis, cow, lesion, footbaths, group topical spray

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Radiological study of the effect of Platelet Rich Plasma (PRP) on experimentally induced Osteoarthritis in Guinea Pig’s stifle joint

N. Seydi, and S. N. Dehghani*

73-78

Abstract

The purpose of this radiologic, longitudinal study was to estimate the effects of the platelet rich plasma (PRP) on improvement of the defective articular cartilage in an osteoarthritis (OA) model. The PRP is an autologous product that concentrates a high number of platelets in a small volume of plasma. It mimics the last step of the coagulation cascade, leading to formation of a fibrin clot, which consolidates and adheres to the application site in a short period of time. Twenty adult guinea pigs (treatment group, n = 10; control group, n = 10) were anesthetized and the anterior cruciate ligament of the left knee was transected through a para-patellar approach. The animals were allowed to resume normal cage activity for 12 weeks. For the preparation of PRP, 2 ml blood was collected into a Na-citrate tube by direct heart puncture. Twelve weeks post-operation PRP was injected into the OA joint of the treatment group only. The animals were observed for further 8 weeks. At 20 weeks radiological score of OA increased in control group. Reduction in the degree of osteophyte formation, and subchondral bone sclerosis were detected in the PRP-treated joints. In conclusion, this study shows beneficial effects of the PRP on improvement of the defective articular cartilage in the OA joint.

Keywords: Platelet rich plasma, Osteoarthritis, Stifle joint, Guinea pigs, Radiological study

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Molecular and phylogenetic characterization of Ornithobacterium rhinotracheale isolates from turkey, quail, partridge and domestic pigeon in Iran

S. Mirzaie*, and M. Hassanzadeh

79-84

Abstract

Ornithobacterium rhinotracheale (ORT) is a respiratory pathogen which has been isolated throughout the world from numerous bird species. The present study was designed to investigate molecular and phylogenetic characterization of ORT isolates from turkey, quail, partridge and domestic pigeon. For this purpose, one bacterial strain from each bird species which was isolated in a previous work was compared with chicken and some other bird species isolates. Isolates were streaked on 5% sheep blood agar containing gentamicin. Genomic DNA was extracted from fresh cultures by boiling of bacteria suspension. PCR was performed by using of specific primers for partial amplification of 16S rRNA gene. PCR products of ORT isolates were sequenced in both directions by an automatic sequencer. Our ORT isolates showed high identity (98.1% to 100%) in sequence of 16S rRNA gene to related data in GenBank. Phylogenetic analysis of these sequences showed that Iranian turkey and pigeon isolates were classified into a distinctive cluster with pigeon isolates from Taiwan, while Iranian quail and partridge isolates showed more relationship with the native isolates of chicken as well as some foreign isolates from different sources in the GenBank.

Keywords: Ornithobacterium rhinotracheale, turkey, quail, partridge, pigeon, PCR

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Laemobothrion maximum (chewing lice) in Iranian Golden Eagles 

H.R. Azizi, M. Adel*, E. Sayahi, A.K. Zamani Moghadam, A. Esmailian Dehkordi, M. Hematzadeh

 85-90

Abstract

     The Golden Eagle species have a wide geographical distribution in Iran. Some species of these birds are native and living in many aeries of Iran with different distribution. This study was carried out on 26 Iranian Golden Eagle that were referred for treatment to the poultry clinic of the veterinary faculty, university of Shahrekord. Twenty eight chewing-lice specimens were collected on the body surfaces of the birds. The parasites were fixed in a 75 % filtered ethanol solution, cleared in 85 % lactic acid and mounted on slides using Hoyer fluid. They were mounted on slides separately after being cleared in lactophenol. Laemobothrion maximum were identified by microscopically examination, also one abnormal shape of this lice was observed.

Key Words: Laemobothrion maximum, Iranian Golden Eagles, lice.

 

2013, Number 2

Journal of Animal and Poultry Sciences (JAPSC)

Vol 2(2), 2013

Effect of cholecalciferol (D3) replacement with 1alpha-hydroxycholecalciferol on broiler breeder hen’s performance

M. Mottaghitalab*, M. Hormozdi, and A. Kamyab

39-47

Abstract

This experiment was carried out to compare the effects of 1α-hydroxy cholecalciferol replacement with cholecalciferol on broiler breeder hen’s performance. 288 Ross”308″ broiler breeder hens at 57 weeks of age were allocated to a randomized complete design with six treatments and four replication of twelve females and 1 male each. Treatments include: 3500 IU/kg vitamin D3 (T1), 3340 (T2), 3300 (T3), 3260 and 3180 IU D3 (T5). The incomplete levels of the vitamin D3 in T2, T3, T4 and T5 supplemented by adding 1α(OH)D3 to the diets at levels 10, 12.5, 15 and 20 gr/ton, respectively and treatment with no D3 supplementation. Results showed, compared to lower levels of the same metabolites and also as compared with the hens fed D3, significant reduction in egg production when 20 g/Ton 1α(OH)D3 was added in diet; however, no differences were observed in egg weight, egg specific gravity, hatchability, early, middle and late embryo mortality and piped egg, plasma calcium and phosphorous concentration and tibia ash between treatments supplemented with combination of vitamin D3 and 1α(OH)D3 as compared with D3. The hens fed diet without supplement vitamin D showed significant decrease in egg production and egg mass, egg specific gravity, hatchability and significant increase in feed conversion ratio and early and late embryonic mortality, without any effect on other traits. In conclusion, replacement of 1α(OH)D3 with D3 in broiler breeder diets have no beneficial effect on egg production, egg shell quality and hatchability. It seems, that hens are able to metabolize sufficient 1, 25(OH)2D3 from dietary vitamin D3 to meet requirement.

Key words: 1α-hydroxycholecalciferol, Broiler breeder, Vitamin D

 
 

The Use of Phytase and Low Phosphorus Levels in Broiler Diets with Different Metabolizable Energy Levels

M. Beiki*, S. M. Hashemi, and A. Yaghoobfar

48-54

Abstract

The objective of this study was to determine the effects of dietary available phosphorus (AP), phytase supplementation and metabolizable energy (ME) levels on performance and bone and blood characteristics of broiler chickens. An experiment in completely randomized design with 2 × 2 × 2 factorial arrangement were conducted, in which two phytase levels (0 and 500 mg/kg), two AP levels (NRC and 15% lower) and two ME levels were used. The ME ratios to CP and other nutrients (except phosphorus) were equal in all treatments. Average weight gain, feed intake, and feed conversion ratio (FCR) of starter, grower and total rearing period were analyzed. Bone calcium and phosphorus, blood calcium, phosphorus and alkaline phosphatase at 6 weeks of age were analyzed. Based on growth parameters, low AP level had equal or better effects than high AP level. Chickens fed diets with high ME levels had better performance. Phytase had no significant effects on weight gain, whereas it enhanced FCR. Adding phytase in low energy diets improved body weight gain and FCR. Phytase in diets with low AP levels significantly enhanced FCR. Using low AP in high and low energy diets, caused better FCR in starter and whole rearing phase consequently. Available phosphorus and phytase supplementations had no significant effects on tibia ash; however, it was inversely affected by low AP level. The results of this experiment indicated that it is possible to decrease dietary AP level up to 15 percent less than NRC recommends. Adding AP and phytase did not significantly affect growth parameters of the chicks fed low energy diets.

Key Words: Available Phosphorus, Metabolizable energy, Phytase, Broiler

 

  

Timing of feeding orchestrates circadian post-feeding intake rhythms in once-daily fed dairy cows

A. Nikkhah

55-60

Abstract

The objective was to establish effects of feed presentation time and dietary forage to concentrate ratio on circadian postprandial rhythms of feed intake in lactating cows. Four multiparous and four primiparous Holstein cows were fed in a 4 × 4 Latin square design (with a 2 × 2 factorial arrangement of treatments) a higher (HC, forage to concentrate ratio = 38.5:61.5) or a lower (LC, forage to concentrate ratio = 50.6:49.4) concentrate total mixed ration (TMR) at either 21:00 h or 09:00 h. A metabolic acquisition system was used to monitor continuous feed intake electronically. Feeding at 21:00 h vs. 09:00 h increased feed intake within 3 h post-feeding, from 26 to 37% of total daily intake; with daily dry matter intake remaining unchanged. Results establish that evening instead of morning feeding increased eating rate shortly post-feeding, and thus, is a key regulator of postprandial circadian intake rhythms in lactating dairy cows.

Key words: Intake rhythm, Feeding time, Chronophysiology, Dairy cow

 

Electrosurgical Excision of a large uniform Transmissible Venereal Tumor (TVT) in a spayed bitch: a case report

 

H. Soleimani Savadkoohi, S.N. Dehghani*, F. Namazi, M. Ahrari Khafi, Y. Jalali

60-64

Abstract

   Canine transmissible venereal tumors (TVT) are cauliflower-like, pedunculated, and nodular, papillary, or multilobulated in appearance. The presenting bitch had a serosanguineous vulvar discharge and big mass in the perinea area. After initial preparation, sonography and radiological imaging was performed to find out any metastatic mass in abdomen or thorax region. Following general anesthesia the tumor was excised by electrosurgical technique. The resected tumor was sent for histopathological evaluation. A chemotherapy regimen was set up for the dog following the operation. A check up six months later didn’t show any recurrence of the mass in this case. This was a rare case of TVT in a spayed bitch.

Key words: Transmissible Venereal Tumor, electro surgery, bitch

 

2013, Number 1

Spawning cycle, GSI index and length maturity of Deep flounder in northwest of Persian Gulf, Iran

                  S. A. Hashemi*, S. A. Taghavimotlagh, A. Hedayati and R. Ghorbani

                                                                                                                                           1-10

Abstract

During this study from December 2009 to November 2011, 363 Deep flounder fish were caught and their weights and lengths were measured. Total number of caught fishes included: 18 males, 200 females and 155 immature fishes. The mean, maximum and minimum total lengths were 264 ± 57, 415, and 115 mm, respectively. The mean, maximum and minimum total weights for this species were 238 ± 150, 827, and 14 g, respectively. The length-weight relationships were calculated as W = 0.000007FL3.09 (n = 200, R2=  0.96) for females, W = 0.00002FL2.90 (n = 18, R2 = 0.94) for males and W = 0.000009FL3.04 (n = 363, R2 = 0.96) for total fishes verifying calculated b with 3, using Students t-test. There was no significant difference between calculated b and 3, and growth pattern was isometric. The mean values of condition factor (K), hepatosomatic index (HIS) and gonadosomatic index (GSI) were 1.25 ± 0.43, 1.13 ± 0.04, and 1.14 ± 0.97 for total fishes, respectively. The highest values of K, HIS, and GSI were observed in February, August and April; whereas the lowest values were observed in January, December and January. Mean GSI value indicated that spawning time were occurred during April to May. Using one-way ANOVA Test, the relationship between GSI index and temperature and salinity was significant. The mean size at first sexual maturity (Lm) was 237 mm for total fishes.

Key words: Deep flounder, Gonado somatic index, Hepatosomatic index, condition factor

  
  

Seroprevalence of Mycoplasma synoviae and Mycoplasma gallisepticum in one day old broiler chickens in Libya

F. S. Elgnay* and S. M. Azwai

11-18

Abstract

The aim of this study was to carry out a serological survey of antibodies against Mycoplasma gallisepticum (MG) and Mycoplasma synoviae (MS) in 1500 one day old broiler chickens sera were examined by serum plate agglutination test. Antibodies against MG and MS were detected 3.4% and 6.4%, respectively. The seroprevalence of MG was 5.2% in chickens from imported fertile eggs and 0% in chickens from local fertile eggs, whereas for MS was 9.3% in chickens from imported fertile eggs and 0.8% in chicks from local fertile eggs.

Key words: Mycoplasma gallisepticum, Mycoplasma synoviae, Serum plate agglutination test, Chickens, Libya

  

Deep Septic Arthritis of the Fetlock Joint in two Dairy Cows: Clinical, Radiographic and Pathomorphologic Findings

M. Nouri*, S.H. Marjanmehr, I. Nowrouzian

19-26

Abstract

The case included two Holstein cows presen­ting chronic septic arthritis of the fetlock joint. There were considerable oval swelling in the fetlock region, presence of pain, severe lameness, and involvement of one hind foot, absence of pastern swelling and interdigital space involvement. In one of cows, early bovine digital dermatitis lesions were found incidentally during examination. Radiographic images depicted a quite wide range of radiographic signs such as soft tissue swelling, new bone formation and osteolysis. Gross necropsy revealed tendovaginitis and the consistent purulent discharge was confined to the fetlock zone. After necropsy, the sample was selected for further procedures by putrefaction. The naked bone showed considerable bone changes. High standards of building design and monitoring seems to have prevented premature culling in cows with severe digital lesion. The chances of restoring the productivity of the animal depend largely on accurate diagnosis and appropriate treatment.

Key words: cull, deep sepsis, fetlock, lameness, swelling, tendovaginitis

 
 

The effect of autogenous platelet rich plasma on experimentally induced osteoarthritis in rabbit’s stifles joint: a radiological assessment.

M. Kalbkhani, S. N. Dehghani*, A. R. Najafpour, N. Ghorbanzadeh

27-38

Abstract

      Osteoarthritis is the most common type of arthritis and the major cause of chronic disability in musculoskeletal mobility in the elderly populations worldwide. In this study, we used scaffold free authogenous platelet rich plasma (PRP) in an experimental animal model of osteoarthritis (OA) by direct intra articular injection. Thirty white New Zealand adult rabbits of both sexes were used in this study. Osteoarthritis was induced by anterior cruciate ligament transection of the left knee joints. The rabbits were divided into three groups randomly; Eight weeks after operation, a single dose (0.5 ml) of plate rich plasma (PRP) was delivered to the injured knee by direct intra articular injection (group 1, the treatment group). The preventive group received the same amount of PRP right after operation. The control group received no treatment. The knees were examined on 8, 12 and 16 weeks after the surgery. The repairing process was investigated radiologically. Radiological assessment confirmed development of OA changes after 8 weeks in rabbits of group 1 and 2. Rabbits received PRP (group 1, the treatment group) showed lower degree of cartilage degeneration, osteophyte formation, and subchondral sclerosis compared to the control group on 16 weeks after surgery. In the preventive group, there was no OA development. PRP could be a valuable medium and the promising source for the treatment of osteoarthritis as well as for the prevention of the development of OA.

Key words:  osteoarthritis, platelet rich plasma, radiology, stifle joint, prevention

Instruction to Authors

Instructions to Authors

Manuscripts for Research, Review, Case Report, and Short Communication submitted to Journal of Animal and Poultry Sciences should be divided into the following sections:

    • Title page
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    • Results
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References should be given in the following form:

For journal reference:

Smith, K. L., M. R. Waldron, J. K. Drackley, M. T. Socha, and T. R. Overton. 2005. Performance of dairy cows as affected by prepartum dietary carbohydrate source and supplementation with chromium throughout the transition period. J. Dairy Sci. 88:255-263.

For book reference:

Underwood, E. J., and N. F. Suttle. 1999. The Mineral Nutrition of Livestock. 3rd ed. CABI publishing, NY, USA.

For chapters in book reference:

Simkiss, K., and T. G. Taylor. 1971. Shell formation. Pages 1331-1343 in Physiology and Biochemistry of the Domestic Fowl. Vol. 3. D. J. Bell and B. M. Freeman, ed. Academic Press. London. UK.

For conference reference:

Kawashima, C., S. Nagashima, T. Shimizu, M. Matsui, A. Miyamoto, and K. Kida. 2008. Effect of exogenous estradiol on plasma metabolic hormone concentrations in the female calf. Page 50 in Proc. 6th International Congress on Farm Animal Endocrinology. Roanoke, Virginia, USA.

  • Tables and Figures

Tables and figures should be self-explanatory and separate pages should be used for each of them. Each figure and table must have a reference in the text and should be numbered in accordance with their appearance in text. The legends of all figures should be given on a separate page after the list of references. Tables and figures should be included at the end of the manuscript.